My language learning framework

The most important lesson that I have learned in my career of almost 15 years in software development is that programming languages are just tools to solve real life or business problems. About 5 years ago I was doing full time .NET, then I jumped to Java for about two years, then I switched to Ruby and Rails, and just recently I started using Kotlin to create two microservices (don’t ask me why, the business needed it ;)).

Because of this, there is no point whatsoever to be bound to a language/platform religiously. The languages are tools but it’s the core knowledge of computer science and software development practices that prevail.

These changes have been inspired by different rationales, sometimes influenced by the employer and sometimes by the economic conditions of the runtime environment. E.g. hosting a Java web application during 2006 was way more expensive than a PHP application, therefore, I used PHP as a primary language for my web facing pet projects. So during my career so far, I have used Java, .NET, PHP and Ruby as my core languages and also have implemented small solutions using Kotlin, Javascript, and Python.

To adapt to this changing environment of ours I have noticed I had created a framework, which I call my language learning framework. The framework itself is not about the language per se, but about the whole ecosystem around that language. It came as a result of identifying unchanging things around any language ecosystem. E.g. no matter the type of language, there is a way to deal with strings, numbers or arrays. Or the language has some sort of collections.

With almost every language that I have used, I have had the need to also learn a framework to develop web applications, a framework to do testing, and other common things around the application. So out of this experience, here I share with you my language learning framework. It lists the things I try to learn or pay attention to when I start learning a new language.

I. Language
1. Runtime & ecosystem (general knowledge)
2. Syntax
3. Data types (if there are types)
4. Main constructs
4.1. packages/modules, classes and methods/functions
4.2. loops & conditioning
4.3. arrays
5. Core libraries
5.1. String manipulations
5.2. collections (lists, arrays, maps, sets)
5.3. math (rounding, sqrt, pow, PI)
5.4. important packages/gems/etc. and any language/platform specific library
II. Frameworks
1. Application development (evaluate popular ones and pick one)
2. Testing (unit & integration)
3. Main design patterns and in that language
III. Toolset & Other
1. IDE platform specifics
2. CI/CD
3. Deployment (does the docker & Kubernetes work or is there anything platform specific)
4. Community
5. important learning resources

Some of these items on the list are dead clear so you just follow it, but some of them are hard, like choosing which framework to use. How do you choose which framework to pick. Well, in those cases, I use different inputs to make my decision but most often it is an educated guess. What I consider is, I ask my colleagues/friends if they have experience with any of the ones I am considering and get their opinions. I also evaluate possible blog posts about them and also try to measure the popularity by checking the number of contributors, how often does a major version gets released, how many job openings I find requiring that framework, and based on all these inputs I narrow my list to two options. Then I try both of them with a certain simple scenario and I try to evaluate how easily I could implement that scenario and get a feeling of both and then decide. Out of all the factors I consider, how much I like it and how many job vacancies are there requiring that framework are two criteria that weigh most with me. The pleasure to work with is very important for me, but also having an opportunity to use it (have an employer/business which actually uses the framework) is also important in my opinion.

One important thing is, when I try to jump on a new language, I try to do all these steps in a relatively short period, potentially with max 2-3 months, and then try to repeat it at least 2 times with 2-3 sample projects. In this way I make it possible for my brain to remember it, otherwise, if it takes too long to go through the list, I forget things in between and the end result is not satisfactory.

This is not a definitive list and doesn’t include everything we need to learn to be productive in one language/platform, but it certainly serves as a good starting point for me when I want to jump into a new language.

Do you have a different approach? Share with us!

Taking over a team, what should you do?

As team leaders, chances of us taking over a team rather than creating a new one are higher. When taking over a new team, I have found very useful to go through several steps to find out some information before moving forward.

As a baseline, I first want to state what is important for me at this stage, so the next steps make more sense to you. I believe that some characteristics must be present in a team to make teamwork possible, and one of the most crucial one for me is communication. If there is no open and clear communication, then you are opening the doors to all sorts of problems, starting with misunderstandings to not delivering any work. So let’s go through my observation points:

Communication

This is the most important one for me and the key to all the successes or failures in the team. It is of vital importance to understand and define the communication means the team feels most comfortable with. Some do prefer verbal communication (this is also my preference when the team is on site) and some do like more written communication, especially when part of the team is remote. From experience, a mix of both, a hybrid communication works pretty well. It maintains the human touch as well as leaves chance for missing or remote people to stay informed as well.

Team dynamics

I believe every team has an individual spirit. That is not individuals, but the group acting together. It is like a one way hash of the team. It is like that as if you remove one person from the team, or if you ad one, the team spirit is different, so the hash changes. The team dynamics tell you how well the currents in the team flow. How well do the team members communicate and get along with their teammates? Who dominates, who leads, and who is the strong influencer? Who is more silent and needs help to get heard and who maintains the balance of the team? Finding answers to these questions will help you determine where and how should your focus be directed to try to get the team to an optimal performance level,

Individuals in the team

Although the team spirit is super important, individuals in the team are as important as the former. Every team member has their unique personality, therefore, their influence on the team is individually different. Ignoring one team member may result in breaking the whole team dynamics. One needs to continuously foster and maintain the individual relationship with every team member. One thing that helps this a lot is having 1 on 1 meetings regularly to check how they feel about the team, is there anything that can be improved or changed that can contribute to having a better engagement or more interesting experience.

Strengths and weaknesses of team members

To take the team to an optimal performance level, I find it of utmost importance to fine-tune or calibrate the way individuals contribute to the team. Every individual has strengths and weaknesses. The importance is to engage them on things they are best at while allowing their teammates to cover on their weaknesses. This contributes to people feel better as they perform best when they do the things they feel most strong at. One might argue that we should push our teammates to improve on their weaknesses, and yes, I agree, but remember, the focus of this post is on improving team performance, there will be another post on helping individuals thrive ūüėČ

Conclusion

When you take over a team which is already established, it is not an easy task to find out how to behave best so you improve the team performance and do not decrease it. My usual approach in these cases is to take my time, usually for a sprint, and do nothing except observe these characteristics. After I create the picture in my head, then I start approaching individuals to find out more about them and complete the picture. It is this time when I create a list of things that need to improve and start acting on improving what needs to be improved and reach a fluent delivery cycle.

Do you have a different experience or opinion? I’d like to hear about it. Please share it with us.

How to unleash employee creativity

At my current company, Springer Nature, we have a great benefit of having the freedom to dedicate 10 percent of our work time working for a side project, learn something new, or on anything that can help us learn something new. Our employer gave us this freedom so we can grow personally and professionally, but one observation I have had during these months that we are practicing this was that it also helps to unleash employee creativity.

How we do it?

This initiative firstly started as a Hack Day for developers. Then we renamed it to “10 percent time” so it can be more inclusive to other profiles that are part of our department, such as UI & UX designers, PMs, and POs. We spend every second Friday of the month by doing something other than work related stuff, something that would in one way or another help us learn something new. Sometimes we do an online course, test that new version of a library we use every day, evaluate a new framework or even learn a new programming language. Beginning of the day we do a joint stand up where we share our plans for that day with other participants. Sometimes someone likes somebody’s¬†idea and we join forces for that day to create something awesome. By the end of the day, we gather together and share what we have created and what did we learn. Some do a demo, some showcase their code and some just summarize their learnings. During this sharing session often people get the inspiration for their next hack day, or sometimes we realize that a presented idea could be of a benefit for the company to grow as a project and we pitch it to our colleagues and management.

What did we do during these days?

During the previous Hack Day, one of my colleagues did create a simple¬† NodeJS CRUD API as she wanted to learn NodeJS. On the other side, as I usually do backend stuff, from time to time I am quite interested to learn things about frontend. For a long time, I wanted to learn Vue.js, so I volunteered to create the frontend for that API. During those few hours of coding, we managed to do a simple Vue.js application and implement a frontend for CRUD operations of that API. The code can be found at¬†https://github.com/acelina/books-fe GitHub¬†repo. Of course, I didn’t become proficient in Vue.js in one day, but next time I need a frontend for my app, at least I know where to start and I value this.

In another case, me and a colleague of mine started a Hack Day project to improve the process of managing code challenges for our developer candidates. We worked on this project for  three Hack Days. The result was an application that included features like managing the automatic creation of a GitHub repo for a candidate, including there her code challenge and give her the privileges to commit to that repo. It also included the feature to manage the workflow of submission, so when the candidate creates a PR of her finished code challenge, the application will remove her from project collaborators and notifies us in a Slack channel that a submission is ready to be reviewed. It was a three fun Hack Days for two of us and it resulted in a production-ready application which eliminated manual labor. There are several other successful results which came out of this 10 percent time.

What we achieved?

I understand that the projects we do during these days are never ready for production, but we achieved to create a culture of sharing the knowledge with others and by it to foster employee creativity. This 10 percent time creates space for us to experiments with things we don’t have the time to experiment during our regular work days because of deadlines or priorities. It also helps us to grow professionally and personally. Sometimes it results in a useful thing for the company as well, and most importantly it helps us to unleash our creativity while having fun. As a developer, I value this a lot in a company, and I would recommend every company to start practicing it. You never know where brilliant ideas come from!

Setup your deployment using Dokku

Production deployment environments come in all sorts of variations nowadays. The configuration architecture is mainly influenced by the size of the application and the budget but also about the process flow and how easy it is to do the deployment. Quite often, at the beginning phase of application/business, it is quite reasonable that you might not need a full-fledged cloud deployment setup. This post assumes that you have small infrastructure requirements but you want a smooth deployment process.For a simpler scenario when you need a single server or few of them, Dokku does a great job by making it possible to push code to production by a simple git push.

Dokku is a Heroku¬†on your own infrastructure. It allows easy¬†management of the deployment workflow of your application by managing applications in docker containers. It also uses¬†an¬†Nginx¬†reverse proxy but as its configuration is managed by dokku itself, you barely notice it. After you deploy your application, you can scale your application up and down with a single command. Through Dokku plugins, you can also create and manage database instances (e.g. Postgres or MySQL), schedule automatic backups to AWS S3, create redis instances and configure HTTPS using Let’s Encrypt.

Some cloud infrastructure providers like Digital Ocean offer a ready-made server image of Dokku which you can instantiate in minutes and start using it right away. In this post, I will go through the process of installing and¬†setting up your own Dokku environment. For this writing, I’ll suppose you have an Ubuntu Server with ssh enabled already in place. For your information, I have a virtual machine (VM) on VirtualBox running Ubuntu 16.04, but you can do the same on any instance of Ubuntu running anywhere. Off we go…

Step 1: Installation of dokku

To do the installation, we follow these commands:

The first line will download the installation script and the second line will actually do the installation. Downloading the script will be fast, but the installation itself will take few minutes (depending on the performance of your server). Please check the this page to find out the most recent version.

dokku setup page

Here in the “Public Key” field, we should paste our public key (mine is at ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub) and then click Finish Setup button. As of this step, our dokku is set and ready.

Step 3: Creating and deploying an application

Now that we have dokku ready, we want to deploy our first app. Setting up the application is a one-time thing which we need to do from the server’s console. After we are connected to our server using ssh, we can create and configure the application in two steps:

    • Run¬† dokku apps:create name_of_app¬†to create the app. We can verify that the app is created by running¬† dokku apps:list
    • Run¬† dokku domains:add hello hello-world-app.com to configure the domain of the app.

In order to serve the app, nginx needs to have a domain configured for the app. If you have a domain to configure, go for it. For this post I will use a fake domain which I will map in my /etc/hosts file to the IP address of my VM. So for this example, I will use hello-wold-app.com domain.

Next, we need to set the git remote for the dokku environment. We do this by running  git remote add remote_name dokku@dokku_server:name_of_app. Here,

  • remote_name is the name we want to give to our deployment environment, this could be anything you like e.g. production, staging, etc.
  • dokku_server is the IP address or the URL of the dokku server we just configured
  • name_of_app is the name we specified when we created the app.

Now that we have it ready, we can deploy our app by running  git push dokku_server master. When the deployment is finished, you can test you application by visiting http:://hello-world-app.com

p.s. if you don’t have a ready application to deploy, go ahead and download a hello world web application from my github¬†account.

 

Step 4 (optional): Scaling your application

Now that we have our web application deployed, it is running in a single instance of a docker container. For a production deployment we probably would want to scale it to more instances to have a better performance. As an optimal configuration, probably we would want to scale the app to as many instances as the number of processor cores we have. Assuming we have an 8 core processor in our server, we could scale our app to 8 instances by running

dokku ps:scale name_of_app web=8

after that we can check the instances by running dokku ls either  or sudo docker ps.

Conclusion

When setting up new applications, I try to take the pragmatic approach and keep it as simple as possible. In my opinion, dokku is a good starting point. It makes the deployment process dead simple as well as gives us the flexibility to scale it as we need. As the application starts facing a lot of traffic and this infrastructure starts to have a hard time coping with it, then I think about more advanced deployment workflows.

If you have followed the steps and tried your own installation, I’d like to hear about your experience. Please post a comment and share it with us.

Hope it helped!

My impression of DevOpsCon 2017 Berlin

Lately I have developed interest on devops. From time to time I try to learn about the new possibilities to automate and optimize my software delivery process, and I find quite exciting to learn about what devops offers today.  I think all developers should at least know a little bit about system administration and devops to understand better the environment their applications are deployed and make themselves more productive. In this post, I will summarize my impression of DevOpsCon 2017 Berlin.

Last two days I had the opportunity to attend DevOpsCon 2017 conference in Berlin. The conference had a pretty busy agenda full of presentations on five different tracks and four different keynotes. The presentations covered broad subjects such as designing microservices, using tools like Jenkins to create container images, security of docker containers, managing delivery pipelines, managing deployment in a polyglot environment, etc.

What I liked: most of the given talks were about real life experiences from some companies and consultants on how they implemented or helped other companies implement devops in their company structure. Some shared their previous failures and what they learned from them, which I found very useful.

What I missed: most of the talks were plain presentations of slides and very little to no demo. It felt a little dry to just listen to people sharing their experience of using a tool without a single demo about it. I was expecting a lot more hands on demos.

What I didn’t like: some of the talks were given by the conference sponsors. As they were showing use cases around their products, sometimes the talks sounded more of a marketing pitch rather than experience sharing presentation.

As a takeaway from those talks and experiences shared, I understood that quite a lot of companies are already working towards having DevOps people on their teams, be it as a specialized position, or as a mixed responsibility of developers or operations people. I also understood that companies quite often are struggling to fit these positions into their current organizational structures and sometimes there is a need to change the way their teams communicate. Being a relatively new position, it is also one of the misunderstood positions as the responsibilities of a devops person are not quite clearly identified in most places.

Backup your database

To backup your database regularly is one of the tasks that can be very easily accomplished but is quite often neglected until the minute you face the first disaster. Backup solutions can be of very complex types which you might engineer to simple ones like copy and pasting. Depending on your application, the necessity for complex solutions might vary. So what could be a minimum solution that is viable and stable?

The simplest solution in my opinion should contain these elements:

  • Create a dump of the database
  • Copy the dump to another location (different from the DB server)

Now depending on your RDBMS and operating system, you can take different approaches to implement these two tasks. On a Linux system with a MySQL or PostgreSQL, my approach would be to write a shell script which does these two functions. One such a script might look like this

Line no. 3 creates the DATE variable which holds the current timestamp. It is used to construct the name of the backup file. Line no. 5 creates the FILE variable which holds the complete path of the backup file. Line no. 7 is the MySQL command to dump the database named “db_name” to the path determined in line no. 5.

So far, this code completes the first task of backup up the database. The next task is to copy it somewhere else so we don’t have the db and backup on the same disk. Now this “somewhere” could be some other server, some other disk, or somewhere else e.g.¬†cloud storage. My preferred choice would be to put it to a cloud storage like AWS S3. Having aws cli installed, copying the backup file to an AWS S3 bucket is a one line code

The complete file would look like:

Conclusion

I know a lot of people might not agree with me that this is a good solution, but in my opinion, this is the minimum code that does the work. What you need to do next is add this script to /etc/cron.daily folder and your script will execute daily and do the backup for you (please make sure that permissions are correctly set so it can be executed). It is not the most elegant solution but does the job.

As a bonus point, I would also add a “done” notification to a script which would send an email or post to a slack channel or whatever notification that suits you so you know that your script has executed.

ElasticSearch – Getting started

Context

A few weeks ago, our team decided to use ElasticSearch for the search functionality of the project we are implementing. I had no previous experience implementing any search engines, so I got excited to get my hands onto doing something really new. What I am going to describe you here is the process I followed do a spike on ElasticSearch and what I learned out of it.

Why should you care about it

Elasticsearch is useful on several scenarios. It is very good for searching product catalogs, creating recommendation engines, logs aggregation and searching for faster debugging, data mining and identification of patterns, and in many more scenarios. There is a chance, the product you are working on might need such a thing.

Some basic concepts first

As an entry point to this task, first I had to learn the basic concepts about ElasticSearch. In essence, ElasticSearch is a document database which uses Lucene as a search engine. It is fast and horizontally scalable, though, it is a very memory hungry system. It stores all documents inside so called Indices. An index can be imaged something like a database in the relational databases world. Inside indices, you can have types, which you might think of as database tables (not exactly like that, but a good analogy).

Data of an index is saved in one or more shards (the default is 5 but this is configurable). Every shard can have one or more replicas. A replica is just a copy of the shard and it serves for optimizing performance and failover. If you don’t have millions of data, it might be good to have fewer shards for a better performance.

Setup ElasticSearch on your computer

To start experimenting, I started with setting up an instance on my computer. Setting up ElasticSearch is pretty easy (at least for the beginning). There are numerous ways you could follow and they are very well documented in their installation page. The approach I took is to have it as a docker container on my local machine so I can start experimenting right away and for production to have a chef script to do the installation for us.

If you already have docker installed, having ElasticSearch up and running on your machine is a matter of minutes by executing pull command to get the image

and running the container

This command runs the container and exposes port ElasticSearch on port 9200. If you try in your browser executing http://localhost:9200 (username: elastic, password: changeme) you will receive a response like

This shows that ElasticSearch is running inside the docker container and you can start playing with it. You can find all these installation details in Elastic’s site.

Loading data to an index

Now that ElasticSearch is running, the next step is to populate some data so we can test the search functionality. At simplest, we can communicate with ElasticSearch using curl cli tool or by using a http tool like Postman, or Sense – chrome extension. Pushing data can be done manually one record at a time, or in bulk. As a first step, we could create an index by executing

This will create index named documents with two shards and one replica per shard. It will also create a type named person.

To insert a person document, we can execute a post request with person’s data

The url segments map to {index}/{type}/{id}. If we didn’t specify id, then ElasticSearch would create an id for us. The response from ElasticSearch for this request would look like

From the response, I can read that I posted to index documents and type person and the request was successful.

For the sake of simplicity, we just posted the data to ElasticSearch without doing any data mapping. If we don’t do it, Elastic will do a dynamic mapping. If you want to enforce the type of data uploaded, you might consider to create a mapping when creating the index. Please take a look at mapping documentation for more details.

Loading more data

Posting one or two documents is easy, however, that would be of little help to really test searching functionality. To make the test more realistically, what I did was to export data from our PostgreSQL database to a json file and then posting the file to ElasticSearch using a curl command

If the export file is too large, you might want to split it to smaller ports (I got the right size by ‘trial and error’).

Searching

ElasticSearch offers plethora of query combinations. The query documentation is large and describes all the ways to construct complex queries with filters and aggregations. To the simplest form, for the sake of demonstration, if I want to search for the person whose phone number is ‘1234567’, the query would look like

or in a more complex form

Either one would bring the same result. For more complex queries, please consult the documentation.

Conclusion

With such a short article, I could only touch the top of the iceberg about ElasticSearch. This article summarises the steps you can take to bring up an instance of ElasticSearch, load some data on it and start experimenting with it. Happy hacking.

Learning process of a software developer

Lifelong learning is a vital skill for software developers. Without continuous learning, I cannot imagine how could a software developer have a successful career in our days. But how can one keep up with the loads of information out there. The amount of information to be consumed passes far our ability to consume and learn. How do we develop ourselves as successful software developers? What strategies should we use? Here is the learning process I use, perhaps it could be useful for you too.

1. Practice

There is a good saying I like: “Practice makes perfect”. If there is one thing¬†that I would choose above all, it is the practice. Writing code is the single most important thing you need to do to get good at software craftsmanship. You may do it in different ways and different levels. Being a full time software developer I would say is the best way, but you may also work on your own or contribute to open source projects in your free time. Apart of full time serious projects, I find it also very useful to work on a side project. Side projects can be fun and may give you the opportunity to learn and enjoy what you do, and often, these projects can be turned to successful projects.

2. Following trends

Following trends is very important to keep your skills sharp. Knowing what is coming next in your industry is of utmost importance to excel in your career as a software developer. Following trends can be done in several ways and you may find which suits you best. You may choose to follow the industry leads in social media, or read regularly their blogs, or you might be just the guy who goes to the events of user groups and conferences. Following trends will show you what you need to learn next and where should you put your focus so you are trained well to cope with future challenges.

3. Video tutorials

Video tutorials have become the common way we consume information today. Videos have many benefits. We can consume higher amount of information in a shorter amount of time. Also, most people learn better when they consume information visually, and this makes watching videos a preferred way to learn new technologies. You may choose to subscribe to a learning site (e.g. PluralSight or Udemy), or you may choose to watch videos in Youtube, you have plenty of choices.

4. Books

Although we have several ways to consume information, I think books are the best choice when you want to learn a technology thoroughly. Tutorials are good to get a glimpse on a technology for evaluation purposes or to get an idea how it is working, but if you want to get a sound understanding of something, I think, books are still the best choice. They usually are more carefully written, present the information more completely and in a flowing order. Yes, they take more time to read and they are larger in volume, but they give you a better understanding and full perspective of a big picture.

5. Sharing

One of the best practices for learning better in my opinion is sharing your knowledge. Be it blogging, showing off your code in a user group, or teaching someone on a what you are good at, sharing your knowledge pushes you learn better what you know. Teaching challenges your understanding of a subject and helps you improve your knowledge. This is my main motivation why I write in this blog.

Summary

The learning process of a developer nowadays might be different and adjusted to custom habits and requirements, however, in my opinion, these are some of the best ways to learn new technologies and always maintain your skills. What are your learning habits? Share with us.

My weekend with Python programming language

This weekend was a long one for me. Unfortunately, I catched cold and had to stay the whole weekend home resting and waiting to feel better. While sitting and wondering what can I do (I wasn’t in a mood to work on anything), I decided to take a look at Python programming language. It’s been a while that I have developed a kind of interest to try this language but never had a chance to take some time out of a busy schedule. Many people were telling me good words about it, how elegant it is and how easy it is to write code using it, but I needed to try it to have my own opinion. Although I could only spend 2-3¬†hours during the whole weekend trying it, I would like to express my first impression of this¬†language.

What I liked

  • There are plenty of learning resources. Although I could have started with a video tutorial, I chose to start with this tutorial by google¬†which seemed to me quite concise and straight to the point. It was showing all important points without getting too much into details. Just what I needed.
  • Coming from a programming background, I found it extremely easy to start coding immediately in python. The language syntax may seem odd at the beginning but the learning curve is smooth. It’s easy to grasp the python way of coding, although, it may take some time to forget putting the semicolon at the end of the line though ūüôā
  • The language seems elegant¬†and rich in features. It has most of the features found in other languages such as Java, C#, and PHP.
  • The fact that you can write code in the command line was interesting to me ūüôā
  • Working with lists and tuple structures was extremely easy and handy.

What I did not like

  • The fact that there are no curly braces and semicolons at the end of the line might cause a little headache for those of us who come with a background from the C line of languages (C++, Java, C#, PHP, JavaScript, etc.). Omitting semicolons looked easier to me than maintaining the lining of code to keep track which code belongs to which block. After you get used to it, the whole code starts to look more elegant and easy to read.
  • You can define variable names same as built-ins overriding system variables. I think this could be a big point of confusion for newcomers.

Summary

I admit, evaluating a programming language by spending three hours learning it is extremely hard and might lead to biased judgments. However, I write this review solely because of my positive impression with this language. I like learning new programming languages as almost each of them have good parts and practices from which we all might learn and benefit. Certainly, python has its share in this and in my opinion is worthy to give a try. For me, my next step should be to find an opportunity to use it in a real life web application and see the experience ūüôā

What is your experience with python? Share it with us.

 

5 reasons you should be a web developer

Over the plenty of career choices in the world economies, choosing what to do for living is not an easy decision. A healthy career comes out of finding the intersection of market demand and what you love to do. Being in the software industry for around fourteen years, and ten of them spent in web development, my career choice of web developer has come out of a funnel, starting as a desktop application developer and refining my knowledge to web development as the potential market started to emerge. But web development has changed dramatically last ten years. The possibilities of web applications often surpass those of desktop applications in market reach and sales perspectives. I will list here 5 reasons you should be a web developer.

1. You can work independently

Being a good team player is an essential skill required to be a part of any organization, but when it comes to starting a private business or wanting to earn some extra money in addition to your full time job, being able to work alone is equally important and a huge benefit. As a web developer, you can create web applications, web sites, themes, and many more digital products which you can easily monetize. You may sell gigs in sites such as Fiver, or create WordPress themes and earn some extra money by working an hour or two in the afternoons at your home .

2. You do not have a big startup cost

Developing web applications does not require huge computing resources. The startup cost is as cheap as having a moderate computer and an internet connection. Many of the software tools which are used to develop web applications are free of charge or cost less than $100. Nowadays, even the hosting providers have lowered the hosting prices quite a bit, and you may easily find good hosting to your web site(s) for ~$5 per month.

3. You can sell your work online

Being a web developer, you do not need any shipping or packaging of your products. You simply push your code to the hosting server and run it there. You may also easily do remote consulting work or create web sites and sell them in different market places. Envato is one of the companies that provides different marketplaces for different digital products, one of them being for WordPress themes: themeforest.net.

4. You may develop mobile applications with web development skills

Web development has evolved over the years, and with that, the support to browsers as well. In current days, you may easily pack a web application as a mobile application and publish it in Apple AppStore, Google PlayStore, or any other mobile app market. The user interfaces may often be very similar to native applications and may create a full featured mobile app with a plain web development skills, thus, allowing yourself access to a huge market and business opportunities.

5. You have plenty of tools and framework to suit your work style

As a web developer, you will have plenty of tools and frameworks which make your job easy in many different ways. Of course this is highly impacted by the platform you choose, but I would confidently say that, all major web development platforms and languages have good communities with good support and plenty of tools available to develop web applications and web sites. This will make your jump start to web development easier and time to market quite short.

If you have not yet decided which profile of developer you want to be, here are five reasons to be a web developer. Web developers have plenty of opportunities in front of them which suits the needs of different kinds of persons. You may be an entrepreneur or a full time professional developer, web development has a lot to offer to you.