Microsoft Certifications: Web development path

Microsoft Corporation offers a rich set of possibilities when it comes to education of new and existing software developers. Taking certification exams and certifying your knowledge is one of the best ways to build a solid knowledge base, improve your skills, and get ahead with your career in software development. In this post I will describe what it takes to follow Microsoft Certifications: Web development path.

In this wide range of certifications, where does one start from? Well, it depends on your current skills and work experience. If you are new to software development with less then one year of work experience or so, then my suggestion is you start with Microsoft Technology Associate (MTA) certifications.

You may start with  following MTA exams:

Software Development Fundamentals (Exam: 98-361)
Web Development Fundamentals (Exam: 98-363).
.NET Fundamentals (Exam: 98-372)
HTML5 App Development Fundamentals (Exam: 98-375)

For the complete list of MTA certifications please see MTA Certifications web page.

MTA certications are optional and are useful only if you do not have work experience developing these solutions.

What after that? The next part of the path is of professional certifications. The web development path leads to Microsoft Certified Solutions Developer: Web applications (MCSD). This title is awarded to anyone who passes these exams:

Programming in HTML5 with JavaScript and CSS3 (Exam: 70-480)
Developing ASP.NET MVC Web Applications (Exam: 70-486)
Developing Microsoft Azure and Web Services (Exam: 70-487)

When you complete all of these exams, you will get the title of MCSD: Web Applications which will certify your knowledge in the field of developing web applications using HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, and ASP.NET MVC.

Certification 70-486: Developing ASP.NET MVC 4 Web Applications

Last week, I took the exam for Microsoft Certification 70-486: Developing ASP.NET MVC 4 Web Applications and passed successfully and scored 831. This was my first exam after almost two years. Although, the exam format and questions’ style did not differ, I certainly noticed some differences.

The number of questions were 45, and the questions were spread in proportion:

22 general questions
23 questions in 3 different scenarios

The test included 3 different scenarios to analyze, and it required a good amount of time to spend on reading code and business requirements of the scenarios in order to be able to answer the questions. Although the scenarios were quite different, it was very easy to mix the requirements, so a good focus had to be put to remember the requirements of each scenario.

The questions were practical, but not easy. They were focused on details of specific features. I was introduced with good amount of questions regarding session management, especially in distributed environments, security implementation, debugging, azure deployment, and related to controller implementation.

To anyone who is preparing to take the exam, my recommendation is to put a focus on the topics above mentioned.

I hope this helps.